Why I removed my IUD and what I now use for birth control instead

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My second child was a miracle. I say that now, after a PCOS diagnosis and a kid who makes life amazing, but at the time it was a major wtf how could this happen moment.

I had just given birth to my first child three months earlier when the two lines appeared on a home pregnancy test. I had no idea when I could have conceived as the one possible instance of post partum intimacy had led me to take the morning after pill, just as a precaution.

My first baby had been 9 pounds 4 ounces, and was delivered naturally at home, so the pain of labour was still very fresh in my mind. I was also not yet sleeping well, was living in a tiny apartment, had no money and was quite honestly scared sh**less. But, I knew in my heart this was a blessing, and given the circumstances was so obviously meant to be.

My second little baby was much kinder to body, weighing only 7 pounds, his birth was easier than the first, but that’s where the easiness ended. He had colic, he seemed to hate sleeping, and was only ever happy in my arms. This time around I swore I wouldn’t tempt fate and wouldn’t even let my husband so much as glance my way until I was safely using birth control.

I went into the hospital at three months post partum and had my IUD inserted while my tiny baby slept on my chest. The insertion hurt, but I felt so relieved, there would be no more surprises any time soon.

Due to all of my hormonal issues I opted for the copper IUD (paraguard). It was touted as  the most natural form of birth control, after all copper is an element essential to health, and I was told it would not affect my hormones at all.

In the beginning I was still nervous about pregnancy. How could this tiny piece of metal really stop a baby? In time I began to feel more at ease with the IUD and eventually came to trust it completely. For me it worked like a charm as far as preventing pregnancy but in other ways my body didn’t seem stoked on the little thing at all.

My periods were so extreme and heavy I would be running to the bathroom every hour to empty my diva cup, and with the heavy blood loss every month (or so) my ferratin levels just would not rise. I eventually became chronically iron deficient. In addition to the menorrhagia my cramps were like early labour pains and I would be fully incapacitated for the first two days of every cycle.

I have a girlfriend who developed breast implant illness, and in reading up a bit about the subject, I came to understand that many people’s immune systems will actually fight against any foreign object in our bodies. I had developed, or at least been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease while using the IUD, and couldn’t help but wonder if it had played some part in my hashimotos disease.

I also learned about copper toxicity, how it can build up in the soft tissues of the liver and impair the livers ability to detoxify. In addition, copper competes with zinc and manganese for absorption in the gut leading to mineral deficiencies.

Anyone with chronic illness will tell you, healing is like a crusade towards the light. My friend finally opted to remove her breast implants and I decided if she could go to that extreme in a quest for health, removing my little IUD would be a cake walk.

I wasn’t expecting any dramatic changes right away, but my first period after removal was like a dream. It came on quietly, no cramps, no bloating, just some slightly tender boobies, and it left just as quietly three days later. My blood loss was what I presume normal periods are supposed to be, and about ¼ the volume of previous cycles with the IUD.

In hopes that it wasn’t just a fluke I waited a full four more cycles before writing this and can now firmly attest that removing my IUD was the right choice.  Every consecutive period has been as benign as the last.

Having PCOS, I am already less fertile than the average woman, but as my pcos symptoms have been steadily improving and my periods have been becoming more regular (thank you diet changes!) I am definitely not in the clear as far as baby making goes, thus I am now using natural family planning to track my cycles.

In order to use natural family planning you will first have to determine your typical cycle length, you can do this using a calendar (start counting the first day of your period) or use a handy app to track it (there are lots of them out there).

Typically, women ovulate 14 days before their period and we are the most fertile 5 days before and 3 days after ovulation. So for about 8 days we should abstain, use condoms, or get busy, depending on the desired result.

We also produce a thin watery mucus when ovulating (kind of like natural lube) that is thicker or even non existent when not ovulating and we are about 1 degree warmer during our most fertile days.

By paying attention to our bodies natural secretions, temperature, and getting in tune with our natural cycles we can family plan naturally, safely and for free.

While only abstinence is 100% guaranteed, lets get real, people are going to be getting busy and we don’t need to rely so heavily on invasive forms of birth control to avoid pregnancy.

I know lots of women who have had great results with natural family planning and if you are struggling with autoimmunity and trying to find that smoking gun, exploring the removal of foreign objects from your body could be a necessary step in your journey. For me removing my IUD has been a game changer.

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